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the occupation in iraq in 2003. it's about 40 minutes, and it's next here on booktv. >> host: been over a year since the last troops left iraq, and look back on the more than 8 years of conflict there, joined by "new york times" national security correspondent, michael gordon, author of "the end game: inside struggle of iraq from george w. bush tobackback." start with the title of the book. what was the end game of last year? >> guest: part of what i wanted to do with the co-author is capture what happened since the surge. there was a number of books on the surge forces in iraq in 2008 and what happened after that, but i was interested in, i think, the real question is what kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we ach
to discuss his book "endgame" about the war in iraq since the occupation in 2003. it's about 40 minutes here on book tv. >> host: it's been just over year since the last troops to iraq to discuss the current status of iraq and look back on the more than eight years of conflict. we are joined by new york times' national security respondent michael gordon, the author of "the endgame" the inside story of the struggle for iraq from george w. bush to barack obama." mr. borden, start with the title of your book. what was "the endgame" when we left iraq in december of last year? >> guest: yeah, well part of what i wanted to do with my co-author was capture what had happened since the surge -- there'd been a number of books on the search forces in iraq in 2008 and what happened after that. but i was interested in the question what kind of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought
. >> this took me three years. the first comprehensive war in iraq and what makes it unique is that incorporate not only american policymakers, but iraqi leadership. trimester maliki, president telekinetic rivals, adversaries, former insurgents and so i incorporated d., but was going on as i was the account type in the battlefield. i basically covered the war in iraq for "new york times" for the whole conflict. i tried to but it altogether. >> why did you call a "the endgame"? >> i covered the search and because it's the endgame of american military involvement. the last third covers the obama administration. it's not been well covered by the media in terms of what the policy was in iraq and i learned lot doing a. during the campaign, president obama talked about the goal of ending the war in iraq. what i discovered in doing the book is the administration on policy object is in iraq went far beyond taking the troops expenditure remaking iraq government and creating a power-sharing arrangement included a feel at her to negotiate so american forces could stay in iraq. >> they try to negotiate one
issue. from 2004 to 2007, the insurgency in iraq produced substantial civilian displacement and emigration from the country. in response to the growing humanitarian crisis, congress passed legislation, which gave iraqis who helped the u.s. government or military the opportunity to receive special refugee status and resettlement in the united states. while the motivation behind creating these special immigrant categories were well intentioned, the fact remains that in may 2011, two iraqi nationals who were given refugee status and resettled in the u.s. were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged that security checks have be
to talk about the end of our war in iraq. >> when president obama started speaking at 8:00 p.m. on august 31st, it was after midnight in baghdad. already september 1st in baghdad. what is recorded as the end of the u.s. combat mission in iraq gets listed as september 2010. not the end of everything in iraq for the united states when we went through that transition, it was really when what started in 2003 finally started to end. the page was turned. >> operation iraqi freedom is over and the iraqi people have responsibility for their country. >> when president obama spoke, there were still 50,000 u.s. troops in iraq, and 50,000 stayed in iraq for another 14 months until everyone finally left the following december. december 2011. but when the mission changed from a combat mission to the train/advi train/advise/assist mission. it wasn't operation iraqi freedom anymore. it wasn't that same war. the way the war came to an end, and it was worth interrupting "wipeout" and "ncis" that night. and it was worth -- at least for me, flying out to baghdad for the historic ending as the combat mission
to you about the end of our combat mission in iraq. >> the time difference between washington, d.c. and baghdad is eight hours. so when president obama started speaking in the united states at 8:00 p.m. on that night, august 31st, it was after midnight in baghdad. it was already september 1st in baghdad. and so what is recorded as the end of the u.s. combat mission in iraq gets listed in the history books as september 2010. it was not the end of everything in iraq for the united states when we went through that transition, but it was really when what started in 2003 finally started to end. the page was turned. >> operation iraqi freedom is over, and the iraqi people now have lead responsibility for the security of their country. >> when president obama spoke that night, there were still 50,000 u.s. troops in iraq, and 50,000 americans stayed in iraq after that night for another 14 months until everyone finally left the following december, december 2011. but when the mission changed from a combat mission to the train, advise, assist mission, then it wasn't operation iraqi freedom
of the year. he is well-known for his book fiasco the american military adventure in iraq and as for his follow up of general petraeus in the american military adventure in iraq. tom spent 17 years as a reporter covering the u.s. military for "wall street journal" and another aide on the same for "the washington post" and in the course of this work he reported on military activities in places as varied as somalia, bosnia and iraq and afghanistan afghanistan and is imparted to teams that won the pulitzer prize. as i've gotten -- i learned that he is the rarest rarest of find to disrupt the thinkers we like to say his energy and intellectual creativity combine in novel ways of thinking. he constantly pushes us to think differently in new ways, more nimbly and provocatively. that is a spirit that infuses tom's new book, "the generals." he explores generalship of good and bad in accountability and traces the history of generalship from george washoe and world war ii to chosin reservoir and vietnam. to colin powell and the gulf war and the generals who commanded the iraq from 2003 on. the g
to end. >> good evening. tonight i'd like to talk to you about the end of our combat mission in iraq. >> the time difference between washington, d.c. and baghdad is eight hours. when president obama started speaking in the united states at 8:00 p.m. on that night august 31st, it was after midnight in baghdad. it was already september 1st in baghdad. what is recorded as the end of the mission gets listed as september 2010. it was noft the end t the end og but it was what started in 2003 started to end. the page was turned. >> operation iraqi freedom is over. the people now have lead responsibility for the security of their country. >> when president obama spoke that night there were still 50,000 u.s. troops in iraq and 50,000 americans stayed in iraq for another 14 months until everyone left the following december. december 2011. when the mission changed from a combat mission to the trained advised mission then it wasn't operation iraqi freedom. it was the way that war came to an end an that's why it was worth interrupting wipeout and the other 8:00 p.m. programming. that's why it was
all the time you spent in iraq and afghanistan and the number of trip you made, what are the numbers? >> guest: a lot of time in disr a lot more time in iraq an afghanistan. for the book i did four trips to afghanistan. a good chunk of -- i think i spent four of my last five christmases or four of the last six christmases in either baghdad or kabul or around that time. it's been since 2005 i've been it's been my life. c-span: you're old? >> guest: i'm now 31. it's been a long decade. c-span: your college was? >> niu. yu c-span: studied what? >> guest: english to certify me to join the work force. my last semester at nyu work forking free to carry news international. glarn you say in your book that there are 27,000 working pr people in the pentagon spending $4.7 billion a year. 27,000? where do you get that number? >> guest: it's a number that includes -- it's a broader number not just sort of the propaganda folks. but advertising but everyone shaping the message from the pentagon. it goes from software programs and social media, there's been a recent example where the army is using a
to the surge in iraq. 2006 we lost -- republicans lost the election and we began the surge, and you wrote a piece in "the washington post," quote, leaving iraq honorably. 2007 you committed -- you said it's not in the national interest to deepen its military involvement. in january of 2007 in a rather bizarre exchange with secretary rice in the foreign relations committee after some nonsense about syria and crossing the border into iran and syria because of the surge, then a reference to cambodia in 1970, you said, quote, when you set in motion the kind of policy the president is talking about here, it's very, very dangerous. quote, as a matter of fact, i have to say, madam secretary, i think the speech given last night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam it's carried out, i will resist it. and then, of course, you continued on and on for months afterwards talking about what a disaster the surge would be, even to the point where it was clear the surge was succeeding. in march 2008, you said, quote, here the term quagmire cou
of violence in iraq. a string of bomb blasts that killed 22 people. this was the scene in the holy city where a car bomb struck a bus carrying she'll pilgrims. four of them were killed. there were other blast in other towns. there has been progress in talks between kurdish military officials and the iraqi central government. two sides are trying to diffuse an armed confrontation on disputed territory, but they've not finalized a deal on how to deploy a joint armed forces into the area claimed by the turkish government as well as iraq. now this report. >> this strip of land could be the battleground for iraq's next armed conflict. kurdish forces are entrenched in their positions. the guns are loaded and ready. the enemy's movements under closer watch. everyone here is on alert and their orders are clear. no iraqi army troops are allowed beyond this area. it's part of the disputed territory between the central government and the kurdish region of northern iraq. the major's it says his forces are here to protect the territory of the kurds. >> our forces are defending the kurdish territories. we
thought, i will take a picture with this guy, and we have a conversation about iraq. i never thought i would get a chance to ask him a question again, especially after he became president. this year there was an off the record straight session for the senior advisers at this bar in orlando. president obama shows up unannounced, and i have a chance to ask one question off the record. the question i wanted to ask, i did ask a question, but i did not ask about drones or civil liberties. it was also an example to me when i am trying to be hard, as critical as possible to do my job even in the moment you are meeting the president. it is not an easy thing to do. a lot of the journalists i was with swooned. i think that is correct. tavis: that is the right word. i am glad you were on as to go on the record and then and tonight. i raise that not to demonize you but to get your take on the media's complicity on not putting the tough questions for work. i ask that in the backdrop of 60 minutes. they punted the conversation. 60 minutes on rolled by the white house on sunday night. print that. you
hagel and republicans called him in the piecer based on what he said in iraq. he voted for the war but turned against it. easer sings very strong. guest: he voted for it and then had criticism of how it was being carried out. when you talk about the secretary defense, the most important thing that happened during the war is the surge. he voted against the surge. he called the worst mistake since vietnam. we know in terms of the military, strategy and the search worked. it was very successful. when you're talking about putting somebody in the secretary of defense has such strong views, in my opinion, that is the question that senators will be asking. host: we are going to share with you from the c-span video library some of the statements by senator chuck hagel and many interviews were conducted with him over the years. our que in a program and a number of speeches he has delivered to give you a chance to hear senator chuck hagel and his own words. what is his nomination signal in terms of what the president wants to achieve over the next four years? guest: i think it signals two th
. and i think it was a very apt quote. >> host: how many women served in the iraq war? >> guest: about 200,000, actually, over 200,000 have served in iraq and afghanistan. >> host: americans. >> guest: yeah, americans. >> host: and is that unusual? >> guest: yes. the iraq war in particular set a precedent historically. more women have served and been wounded and killed in the iraq war by around 2005, two years into the war already, than all the american wars put together since world war ii including afghanistan. so it was a huge, huge difference. one in every ten troops in iraq was a woman. >> host: did they serve in different capacities than they have served in the past? >> guest: yes. payoff the nature of the war, which is -- because of the nature of the war which is, base chi, a guerrilla war, the nature of all wars these days, there isn't a front line in our old-fashioned sense of having an area where the soldiers and the enemy will meet up and fight. that just doesn't happen anymore. wars -- battles take place in roads, in hospitals each if you're drive -- even if you're driving a tru
apologized and his opposition in iraq and troop surge and independents what he called the jewish lobby and called for talks with hezbollah. all which led lindsay graham and in your face nomination, that the number two republican senator frankly skeptical. >> i think the president has much better choices as secretary of defense than to choose somebody who fails when it comes to the number one security issue mainly a nuclear iran. >> he praised john brennan's tireless work as counter-terrorism director. >> reporters ask you, you don't get any down time. john said, i don't do down time. [ laughter ] >> brennan will face questions about drone strikes that may be more properly direct at the president. republicans may use the confirmation hearings to question about brennan about the attack in benghazi. his focus is on thrift threats in this country. in 2008 brennan withdrew his name from c.i.a. director rather answer questions about water boarding. he privately told mr. obama he opposed. >> john mccain still has questions about what role brennan played in enhanced interrogation and why he pu
was in the spotlight, but it was bush's war in iraq that was really on trial. conservativ conservative conservatives despise hegel, but they despise him because of the iraq war. they fear hegel because he's a warrior, a vietnam vet with two purple hearts who knows how war should be fought and should not be fought and how war should be the last resort. >> in my 12 years in the senate, my one guiding principle on every security decision i've made and every vote i cast was always this, simply this. is our policy worthy of our troops and their families and the sacrifices that we asked them to make. >>> i saw it from the bottom. i saw what happens. i saw the consequences and the suffering and the horror of war. >> hagel seen the suffering, the horror of war up close. president obama wants him to help lead our country out of war and into peace. and, today, conservatives attacked him for it. >> senator hagel's record is deeply troubling and out of the mainstream. >> you continue to hold, i believe, extreme views far to the left of even this administration. >> my single biggest concern, senator, about the n
surgery. ♪ >> you are watching al jazeera live from doha. deepening divisions in iraq. clamming discriminations by the shia-led government. almost a million remain homeless in the philippines. thousands of shark fins discovered on a rooftop in hong kong. controversial delicacy is booming. ♪ less than a week before he is due to be sworn in for a second term, the latest news on venezuelan president is not encouraging. the government says hugo chÁvez is suffering from complications from a severe lung infection after cancer surgery in cuba of. >> under pressure for more information on the state of the nation's leader, venezuelan officials have told us more about hugo chÁvez's cancer. >> falling the sensitive surgery on december 11, commander hugo chÁvez has faced complications as a consequence of a severe lung infection which has resulted in a respiratory deficiency that requires hugo chÁvez to remain in strict compliance with his medical treatment. >> chÁvez successor has been appearing regularly assuring people the president will return. sooner or later, we will see command
, about the future of iraq how do you think they view our role around the world? >> if you're asking me, i think president obama thought united states was over-extended military low, not just in terms of the sheer number of troops but in terms of the exposure and risk to american interests. and i think the white house is essentially agnorfolk-- aggnostic of the value on maintaining a minimal force in iraq. in the end they were talking about a force of 3,000 to 5,000 including special operations. but i think the way they played the iraq end game didn't work out well from an american standpoint and it's one reason iran has been flying hundreds of tons of arms to the assad regime through iraqi airspace because there's basically a security vacuum in iraq right now from an international standpoint. >> rose: david what, do you think about the next four years? >> i think president obama made clear during the campaign that he wants to believe the president who ended the wars, including his own surge in afghanistan. the president was bringing the troops home. i think there's an understanding at the
's too much reaction to iraq and inaction here he compares to the first president bush not doing anything about the shiite uprising in iraq in 1991, which he argued led ultimately to the second gulf war. i think that may be an area where people would debate, but what are the consequences of the u.s. hanging back in syria? >> well, if we hang back in syria, there could be a dissent into chaos. it's already headed in that direction. again, the rise of these islamic jihadist groups, they're actually in the lead in the fighting against the syrian regime. and of course we've got chemical weapons there that could well get into the hands of these jihadist groups. so there's a potential there for spillover to our major allies in the region who all border syria, turkey, jordan, israel, also lebanon. and the potential for a sectarian divide between shiites and sunnis that could spread from syria, exacerbate the tensions that are already there in iraq and then down to the gulf. >> you have the arab revolution's lead to now the rise of these islamist authoritarian governments. what are the consequenc
out to grant park in chicago to cheer on veterans of the iraq war and the afghanistan war as the second city staged the second welcome home parade. to say welcome home to the soldiers. go chicago. there were marching bands and motorcycles and war dogs and more than a thousand veterans turning out to hear thank you. with the december 15th parade, chicago became the biggest city in the united states to hold an event like this one. maybe in the year 2013 an event like this will take place in new york city. all yearlong regular joe and jane citizens took the initiative and decided to do it on their own. every time they did it it was the best new thing in the world. our nation's first ever, look at that, first ever parade for troops coming home from the war in iraq. it happened saturday in st. louis, missouri. tens of thousands of people lined the streets. this is a thank you big enough to make the nation notice and personal enough to grab your heart and rattle it a little. >> twice he's flown home after serving in iraq. >> you could drop me in any city in the united states bec
that conflict. the word appeasers seems to be pretty strong. -- iraq, but then turned aginst that conflict. the word "appeaser" seems to e pretde pretty strong. guest: the most important thing that happened during the war was the search. he voted against the surge. he called the worst mistake since the vietnam. when you're talking about putting somebody as secretary of defense and has such strong views, and wrong views, that is something that will be asking him. host: we're going to share with you some of the statements by senator haggle -- hagel. also, a number of speeches he has delivered, to give you a chance to hear senator hagel in his own words. steve clemons, what does this nomination signal in terms of what the president wants to achieve? guest: two important things. it signals that he once an independent, no-nonsense voice at the table around the president. senator hegel's had a close relationship with president obama. i happen to know that the quality of conversation, the nature of the conversation is very direct, often not in agreement. the president is not bringing on board a y
for the big game. brendan morocco lost all of his limbs while serving in iraq. now he has been given >> a soldier who lost all four of his limbs in iraq is on his way to recovery. brendon morocco was injured while serving in iraq in 2009. he is the first quadruple amputee to survive his injuries. he received a double arm surgery recently. his story will be on 11 news at 5:00 p.m. i'm sure it will be a moving one. knew today as recover the nation, the senate foreign relations committee has approved john carey as the next secretary of state. he will replace hillary clinton. the senate panel approved his nomination with no opposition. a second vote will be taking place this afternoon by the full senate. for the past 28 years, he has served on the senate foreign relations panel and has been its leader for the past four years. there will be special election in late june to replace him. considering lifting its decades- long ban on gays, the boy scouts showed signs of areas to remove the band from the national organization roles. that would leave it up to the sponsoring organizations of loc
that the united states has built have been tayloreded to support operations in iraq and afghanistan. that force will have to change as the united states focuses increasingly on the pacific where distances are greater and it will face far more sophisticated potential adversaries, here to talk about the future of the sprawling network is the deputy chief of staff for intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance, lieutenant general larry james. welcome to the program. >> thanks good to be here. >> let's start off first before we get into the future of f that. all eyes are on the operation that are going on in mali and said that the united states is supporting that through intelligence and other means. what can you tell us about the support the united states is giving the mission. >> i didn't get into operations and support at this time. i would refer you to th secretary of defense's comments and the things he has said to date and it's in flux as we work our way through this situation, but he will take the lead on that. >> let me go to the issue of just al-qaeda in general. the end product is track
. >> hagel was a thorn when he turned against the iraq war. >> republicans don't consider him a republican. >> chuck hagel has left the republican party. >> he has long cut his ties with the republican party. >> when he endorsed president obama in 2008. >> democrats don't accept him as an alternative choice. >> hagel appears to be a man without a party. >> is chuck hagel the right choice for secretary of defense? it is certainly not the most easy one. >> the new conservative dominance of policy thinking ended when barack obama was elected president. but today was the day that the obama administration made the single biggest play to define what comes next. today, he nominated chuck hagel, in doing, he nominated the first vietnam veteran. >> he understands that sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt and mud, that is something we only do when it is absolutely necessary. my frame of reference, he has said, is geared to the guy at the bottom who is doing the fighting and the dying. with chuck, our troops will always know just like sergeant hagel was there for his own brother, se
-american but government. in libya are anti-iranian like saddam hussein's government in iraq. every single government in the middle east is either pro-americans in negotiations to become pro-american or anti-iranian. it pretty good position for the 90s dates in the middle east. but because of election, today governments across the middle east and egypt, tunisia, lebanon, palestine, turkey, iraq are on no longer pro-american or anti-iranian. they are all pursuing at least independent foreign policies, which are by definition much less to see a stick about strategic cooperation with the united states and much more open to the islamic republic of iran. simply put, today relatively speaking the united states is in a profoundly weaker position in the middle east and the sonic republic of iran is in a significantly stronger position. this essentially have been because there is a dramatic shift in the middle east onto power. in our book, "going to tehran," we describe how part of this shift has been as occurring is because of mistakes and american policies in the middle east. but we also describe in our boo
was over and the campaign was one, omar bradley fired terry allen. my job dropped. i just come out of iraq where no one got fired. when mediocrity was our goal. and instead i hear about the army firing one of our most effective division commanders in europe our first year in the war. and naturally the threat that began, the book for me, going back and studying this. bob took me inside one day and said we need more about george marshall. a couple years later i'm in the archives, i immersed myself into the marshall papers. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he was a likable guy. the other hero of the book is eisenhower. i think eisenhower is underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was -- >> montgomery is a piece of work. at one point -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944, i'm sorry, montgomery won't meet ike so ike flies up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he wrenched his knee. so montgomery comes to see him, pulls out the memoranda and says did you write this? shia rubbish. essential
of the oil. that's why there was an iraq war in 1991 over the invasion of kuwait. what the arabs understand, once iran is nuclear it becomes the most aggressive islamic state in charge of the area in the middle east. that's why those have beseeched the united states to take out the nuclear program in advance. the saudis would line the deserts with arrows saying this way. lastly, i'm running out of time, i hope, perhaps you will resist from applauding at six-minute mark, or at least the 60% who are not sympathetic to our view and drown out the others. this is a regime that has threatened to annihilate israel and expressed its intentions to do so. we are relying on deterrence because it worked in the cold war. the cold war was different. the target of the united states was a continental nation, israel is a one bomb country. [cheers and applause] i commend you. i will stop here and say there is a radical difference between the soviet -- u.s. relationship. you will not ask jews in israel to rely on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. >> charles, if it makes you better hen
francisco international poetry festival from iraq i've been in touch with for more than a year and a half. after the united states would not give him his visa, i asked him -- i told him about mutanabbi street and he wrote a poem and he wrote it in english, though he writes in, of course, in arabic. but this one he wrote in english. so i'll read it. one figure in the poem you should know, humbaba, which is an ogre, a monster of immemorial age. that was a special big garden, a forest, where all types of trees and flowers grew. the trees bending down gently flinging branches. our orchard grew like a crown on the sun's eyebrow. where did humbaba come from? his mother was just a cave, his father unknown. who made him a friend pretending guardian of the orchard. did those nice shrubs need fear to go begging for a garden and have humbaba in his treachery ilk. those plants and flowers were like books everyone could read, not cut and throw away. their different fantastic colors had formed our blood so our veins ran smoothly, our 7 wonders showed. then humbaba made a whirlwind of fire and snow. who
\ >> protests in iraq turned deadly. five are killed in the city of fallujah. you are watching al jazeera live from doha. also making headlines, protesters gathered in egypt to mark the second anniversary of the revolution. police fight with protesters overnight. talking tough. north korea threatened to attack south korea because of u.n. sanctions. french forces stepped up their offensive against rebels in mali. we are on patrol with them in the north. plus, why young people in cuba are playing with the idea of making music their career. we are getting reports of iraq that least five protesters have been killed in scuffles between the army and worshippers near the city of fallujah. thousands have been protesting for more than a month against the prime minister's government. they say the government promotes sectarian policies that discriminate against them. the latest violence began after the police. -- block protesters from entering the city. >> which call upon the army -- we call upon the army affiliated with iraq. if it is only loyal to the muslim nation and only belongs to the
center at west point, and the second part is to tell you about what we teach cadets with regard to iraq, where i have spent 12 months on three different tores, and talk about afghanistan where i just came back last summer, spent from the summer of 2010 and the summer of 2011 in afghanistan, and then talk a little bit about the way forward with regard to national secret. i will try to leave plenty of time for questions and look forward to your questions at the end. when the world trade towers collapsed on 9/11, it was 45 miles south of new york city. i was teaching a class at the time, and we had a scheduled briefing by the dean of the academic ward from the west point class of 1968. he was supposed to speak about what they were going to major in, and it got all the sophomores and an auditorium that holds 1100 cadets, and it was 12:30 right after lunch on 9/11, and he said, events like this is when the military and the army go into action and get things done. and that is what we have had to wrestle with at west point, of what you do, how do you change the curriculum, what do you do to pr
to war with iraq, people inside iraq who were enemies of saddam, people who wanted the u.s. to invade iraq and overthrow him found that the u.s. government, and in some cases the u.s. press were very interested in hearing all the horrible things they had to say about saddam. now, saddam was a horrible guy, so it wasn't hard to find horrible things to say about him. but the known record of his awful behavior toward his own people had previously not been enough to get the u.s. to invade iraq. but once the bush administration got bent on war, once it seemed like the u.s. was being led to war, and it just needed to be tipped a little bit further, all sorts of new horrible things about saddam hussein that hadn't been known before started to pop up in the press. a cia report that saddam had imported aluminum tubes that could be used in centrifuges to enrich uranium to make nuclear weapons that exciting little piece of data, which proved to be out of context and not true. that's not what the tubes were for. that nevertheless ended up on the front page of the "new york times." it had been lea
out of iraq and came on the joint staff the summer of 2008, it was getting worse. we had elections coming in the united states and then they had elections in afghanistan. my predecessor in afghanistan general mckernen asked for some troops in 2008. it was decided not to act on that request on the last months of president bush's administration and there was some ongoing assessments. when president obama assumed office with his team in january of 2009, in fact that request was tabled in front of him. and now we have a new administration who has been in the campaign rhetoric supportive of the war in afghanistan. they're faced with a larger quest for troops, faster than they might have liked to be comfortable and time to die just that. they're also hit with a financial crises when it first took over. and so the first response i think is to say well give us time to assess this. but instead, the military department of defense appropriately says we've got afghan elections approaching in the summer and if these forces are going to van impact to help widen security, they have to be approved
to oppose hagel. and hagel they don't think he's strung enough on israel and iran and iraq. >> what do you believe? what are you able to support? what do you think? why are you elected if you want a safe job go sell shoes. >> cenk: we have four advisers. on the show tonight to talk about that, and then finally we have a fun and interesting story about the world's poorest president. he's from uruguay. >> i'm not a poor president. >> cenk: i got to be honest with you, he's a poor president especially when it comes to monday. we'll explain. go time. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> chuck hagel for secretary of defense. >> chuck hagel will have a fight for confirmation. >> the leader our troops deserve. >> the most antagonistic, it is very difficult to imagine the circumstance in which i could support in confirmation. >> yes, he is a serious candidate. >> chuck haig settle not a responsible option. >> he has people going against him. >> john brennan for direct of the central intelligence agency. >> while i consider myself neither a republican or democrat democrat. >> brennan has a little bit of bag
for republican senator chuck hagel, fellow republicans have criticized him for views on iraq, iran, and israel. then, the steubenville rape case in ohio. >> we are anonymous. around mid august 2012, a party to present a small town in ohio known as steubenville. [indiscernible] kidnapping and rape of a 15- year-old girl. >> the hacker activist group anonymous has helped expose new details about a horrific high school gang rape case involving football potyers in ohio. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. up to 18 people have been killed in the latest u.s. drone attacks on pakistan's tribal areas. the strikes hit what pakistani officials described as separate compounds belonging to the pakistani taliban in south missouri stan. the taliban commander was reportedly among the dead. the ongoing drone attacks come days after a federal judge ruled the obama administration is under no obligation to publicly disclose their legal justification. the american civil liberties union and the new york times had filed a lawsuit und
cash which concerns his experiences as a chaplain in combat in iraq. another portion of her work, also within the general area of religion, has focused on the fate of christians around the world, and in particular, their prevails in recent years. this included the award winning "their blood cries out," also co-authoredded with paul marshall, and "eyewitness to a broken world," and cox is a distinguished member of the house of lords, famous as a campaigner for human rights and for christian rights. there will also be out fairly soon another book called "persecuted: the global assault on christians" to be out in early 2013. this brings me tore most recent book, the one we are here to discuss with her. i have many questions to ask her, but before doing so, let me say a few general things about this book, my own, as we say these days, take away from it, and then hopefully i will have gotten it right. we can get into specific questions that arise from it. this book is, fist, as the subtitle indicates, a book about israel as seen through the eyes of a christian, a christian so sojorner who i
to the city across the riegger -- river. hey have shown rebel fighters. iraq's parliament has passed a new law which will limit the prime minister's time to two terms. it means that the current leader will not be eligible to run for a third term. iraq is due to hold general elections next year. they said they will appeal the legislation the change to the law was made while the opposition grows. a sniper can from two soldiers on saturday. for several weeks protesters have been demonstrating against what they saw as the secretary of policies. six people were killed while trying to march through the city. >> protesters burning tires what the main highway from iraq to jordan saying they would stay there until their demands were met. they later dissipated. they come from a funeral of six protesters who were killed by iraqi soldiers. they're saying they're being discriminated against in this country. to iraqi soldiers were shot dead at a checkpoint. they say they have withdrawn collusion and have given a over to the federal police. that is meant by a political crisis in baghdad. the parliament on sa
. >> for more on the threat in out here, he formerly served as ambassador to iraq and national security adviser in the bush administration. when you were at the white house, was al qaeda in north africa ont he radar? >> yes, it was. we looked at the whole system holistic lee. there were relatively inactive because of jury instead taken effective steps with some encouragement of the united states. with the situation involving in libya, there has been a lack of government control and a huge swath of the region. an explosion of uncontrolled weapons and to some of these groups, we see this in algeria and it should be seen by one campaign from the french fighting to what is going on in algeria. we have had many laws of unintended consequences and the middle east. think of the effort to get the soviets out of afghanistan and what it led to. this is a characteristic of the region, not a characteristic of bad politics. it was good to get rid of gaddafi and the soviets. from the pakistan border to the atlantic ocean, you will have something like this, get ready >> are they the same it. ideologically as
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